Shards of a Broken Ship in a Bottle

Shards of a Broken Ship in a Bottle

Littering my workspace now, on top of all the other conflicting elements, are shards of a broken ship in a bottle, obscured by clouds.

http://alonetone.com/worldwar9/tracks/three-way-tie-for-last

I’m struggling mostly with the “Gestalt” theory of the evolution of the artistic process. “Gestalt” is German, I believe; and embodies the spirit of “the Whole is Greater than the Sum of it’s Parts”, which I learned much earlier in my life but have never really gone to great lengths to explore.

But in this day and age of unlimited ( virtually ) recording time & unlimited hard drive space, it’s been hard for me to nail things down. On this track, “Three Way Tie for Last,” I decided to limit the length of the track to seven-and-a-half minutes, which helps reign things in from the problems I had recording the “Knockin’ Boots with the Two-Bit Grifter Sisters” full-length L.P.

Basically, though, I’m running into production problems nailing down the number of instruments allowed, the number of takes of each instrument, grouping & rendering sets of tracks into stereo mixdowns, and basically all the major problems you can expect when there is no upper limit to the amount of Stem mixes you end up with, and it just seems like now, there’s an insistent need for me to lay down “just one more reverse-reverbed cymbal track”, or “I know; let’s try muting the guitar that we thought was so great & give it another listen”, kinds of issues.

Will I ever sweep up the shards? Your guess is as good as mine. Will I ever find another pillow as good as the pillow I kissed good night at the end of “Three Way Tie for Last?” Who knows. Will I ever find another bottle to put the ship in? Or maybe the next bottle will already have a ship in it. Hmm…