Comments on charlieferret's stuff

charlieferret's avatar
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Guest said

Yes, chaos! A great interpretation! Oh, what a dear little man, he's so cute!

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Orwell [9] version
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Wildgeas Music's avatar
Wildgeas Music said

That's some funky sounds. Creatively cool.

charlieferret's avatar
Details http://chrisvaisvil.com/?p=1602
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Guest said

a tastey treat for all !

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Peter Gunn with persian ney francesca vocal fx frame drums kalimba gongs hang drum
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Guest said

Love the melody! Very angular and bluesy.

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Peter Gunn with persian ney francesca vocal fx frame drums kalimba gongs hang drum
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Norm's avatar
Norm said

Charlie, I too have a fascination with "The Theme Song From Peter Gunn"... one of my favorite from Mancini. The francesca vocal fx is slightly reminiscent of the skat singing of Edie Hart, so I am sure this would fit right in at *Mother's*.

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peter gunn theme played by a sax section + bass in 9 et
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Norm's avatar
Norm said

Best bass groove of all time. I can't help but think of the Blues Brothers and the old arcade game "Spy Hunter" when I hear this.

charlieferret's avatar
high school marching band version - normal tuning
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Guest said

Nice interpretation of an old standard, more please

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thetworegs's avatar
thetworegs said

like a scene from reefer madness.......

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high school marching band version - normal tuning
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thetworegs's avatar
thetworegs said

and a good one it is too Charlie

charlieferret's avatar
I have tried to make a literal representation of this from Mat Cooper: "I consider rhythm to be ultra-low pitch. Polyrhythms are then Just Intonation. For example if rhythm1 cycles through 4 beats in the same time as rhythm2 cycles through 3…
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Norm's avatar
Norm said

Well, is it microtonal? What do you make of this? As for me, when it is in a tempo range that I can follow (mid range) it sounds like a basic 4vs.3 polyrhythm. This makes sense to me, as all of the drum tones drop back into the their common denominator of 4 or 3 and resound in unison. So, I get the sense of polyrhythm, but not microtonality. It would be interesting to me to repeat this experiment with, for example, piano key tones to see if the results are the same, i.e. is one left with a sense of 4vs.3 polyrhythm or something else. My hypothesis is that the effect will be the same. I do not believe the pitch of the notes relate to this question. And I also think that at this point I do not agree with the premise that "polyrhythms are then Just Intonation": polyrhythms represent a relationship in time, whereas Just Intonation represents a relationship in pitch.

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